science-junkie:

An identification chart of 42 North American butterflies.
By artist Eleanor Lutz. You can find the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here.

"Work until your idols become your rivals."

- unknown (via psych-facts)

"You can’t say “I don’t do politics,” because silence is a political statement."

- Tariq Ramadan (via uniteforpalestine)

(via gentlenight)

apsarcasm:

sherlocksmyth:

Deflate when writing prose; inflate when writing essays for school.
This is my current phone wallpaper. I recorded this scene from Monument Valley and then converted it into a gif. 
Lizard person

"Strive for progress, not perfection."

- Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

asylum-art:

Limzy Wei: Flowergirls

artist on tumblr

Malaysian artist Lim Zhi Wei adorns her watercolors entitled “ Flowergirls” with real flowers, to a stunning effect.

(via makos-lightningrod)

4 Things To Do If You Don’t Land The Job

Didn’t get the job you were gunning for? Don’t take it personally. There can be any number of reasons this particular role wasn’t meant to be - but that doesn’t mean an even better job isn’t right around the corner! Turn this experience into a positive and use it as an opportunity for growth with these four tips from recruitment experts.

1. Seek feedback. Feedback is one of the most useful tools for job seekers; so don’t be afraid to ask why you were unsuccessful.

“Try to glean as much open and honest information as you can about why you didn’t land the job - from the recruiter or employer, or both if possible,” says Steve Shepherd, employment analyst at recruitment and HR services, Randstad.

“Ask as many questions as you can about your interview performance, and why they didn’t see you as the right fit for the job.”
 

2. Adapt. Richard Wynn, regional director at Michael Page, says getting feedback should be straightforward: “It’s what you do with that feedback that is important. Don’t just sit on it – take it on board and adapt.” 

Shepherd agrees that’s it’s important to tweak and adapt according to the comments you receive.

“Use feedback to make changes to your CV, to your style of interview, the information you share, the stories and examples you provide and the questions you ask. Employers want to know that you’ve done your research, that you have the right attitude, you demonstrate the right behaviours and commitment; that you really want to work for their organisation and that you are the right fit.”
 
3. Be resilient. Rejection sucks, no matter what the situation, but just because you didn’t get this particular role doesn’t give you a free pass to spiral into a pity party for one.

“It is easy to feel deflated after an unsuccessful application, so remind yourself of your strengths, skills and experience,” suggests Andrew Morris, a regional director at Robert Half. “List them out and add in a few recollections of the times you’ve done something brilliant, like solving a difficult problem for a previous employer.”

Chandler Macleod consultant Matthew Callow advises candidates to stop and breathe, think rationally, and get back in the game.

“Job hunting is survival of the fittest. You have to keep moving. You may have missed your target this time, but over the hill is a whole pasture of opportunities. If you waste time sulking, someone else will get there first and you’ll go hungry.”
 
4. Stay focused. Shepherd believes one of the key things you can do after facing rejection is to remain motivated to land your dream job.

“What’s meant to be is meant to be, so if you didn’t get that role, it just means there is another one that is going to be a better fit for you. You just have to have the right attitude and commitment to securing it.”

Morris says interviews often fail due to a lack of good preparation, and encourages job seekers to reflect honestly on how prepared they were for their last interview, and up the ante next time they get a call back.

“For your next round of applications, make sure you find out everything you can about your prospective employer, from their recent financial results to who you would be working with.”

(Source: theseeker.seek.com.au)

"If they miss you, they’ll call. If they want you, they’ll say it. If they care, they’ll show it. And if not, they aren’t worth your time."

- Lessons Learned in Life (via onlinecounsellingcollege)